Archive for the ‘Blog’ Category

Modeling the diffusion of complex innovations as a process of opinion formation through social networks

18
May

A new research article by Valentina Assenova demonstrates how innovations diffuse through networks. Her model incorporates opinion formation processes that occur through diffusion. She also tested her model with diffusion data from a field experiment previously collected in India (Banerjee et al., 2013). The research article is published in PLoS One: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0196699 A podcast about the article is here: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/can-innovation-spread-faster-through-social-networks/ Reference: Banerjee A, Chandrasekhar AG, Duflo E, Jackson MO. The Diffusion of Microfinance. Science. 2013;341(6144):1236498. pmid:23888042

SONIC Speaker Series presents: Prasad Balkundi

18
May

The SONIC Speaker Series presents Prasad Balkundi Organization and Human Resources, University of Buffalo The Negative Side of the Social Ledger: A Meta-Analysis SONIC Lab is proud to welcome Prasad Balkundi of the University of Buffalo. Dr. Balkundi will speak on Wednesday, April 18th, 2017 at 10 AM in Frances Searle Building, Room 1-483. Please contact Dr. Michael Schultz with any questions.   Abstract: Despite a resurgence of research on negative ties in social networks, a comprehensive understanding of negative and positive has yet to be provided. Incorporating evidence from prior 163 independent samples we examine whether the initiation of positive and negative relationships (i.e., out-degree) or the reception of positive and negative relationships (i.e., in-degree) is more impactful to the focal employee’s effectiveness. Furthermore, to address the negative asymmetry hypothesis in social networks, we compare the relative importance of positive versus negative work relationships while holding the directionality constant. This meta-analytic review makes five contributions to theory on negative and positive social networks by (a) demonstrating the undermining impact of negative ties on performance and job attitudes; (b) providing information on the negative ...

SONIC Speaker Series presents: Gianluca Carnabuci

17
May

The SONIC Speaker Series presents Gianluca Carnabuci Organizational Behavior, ESMT Berlin Good For One But Bad For Most? How Intra-Organizational Networks Impact Innovative Performance At The Inventor And Firm Level SONIC Lab is proud to welcome Gianluca Carnabuci of ESMT Berlin. Dr. Carnabuci will speak on Wednesday, April 26th, 2017 at 10 AM in Frances Searle Building, Room 1-483. Please contact Dr. Michael Schultz with any questions.   Abstract: Extant organizational research suggests that R&D scientists tend to be more productive (i.e., they generate more impactful innovations) when they occupy a central position within their organization’s intra-organizational collaboration network. Does this imply that an organization’s overall innovative performance would increase if the organization encouraged its R&D scientists to pursue more central network positions? We address this question using a multi-level panel dataset describing the evolving intra-organizational networks of 140 semiconductor firms, as well as the individual network position of each of their R&D scientists. We proceed in three steps. First, we confirm that network centrality does enhance scientists’ innovative performance within our empirical sample, even after controlling for unobserved individual- and organizational-level differences. Second, we simulate how the overall intra-organizational network of ...

SONIC Speaker Series Presents: Sadat Shami

17
May

The SONIC Speaker Series presents N. Sadat Shami Director, Center for Engagement and Social Analytics IBM The Application of Social Analytics to Understand and Improve Organizational Outcomes SONIC Lab is proud to welcome N. Sadat Shami of IBM. Dr. Shami will speak on Monday, February 26th, 2017 at 10 AM in Frances Searle Building, Room 1-483. Please contact Dr. Michael Schultz with any questions.   Abstract: The increased adoption of social media in the enterprise provides an opportunity for organizations to receive real-time feedback from employees on organizational issues. Enterprise social media provides a platform for employees to express their thoughts and opinions on organizational programs, policies, and strategies through unstructured text in status updates, blogs, online community forums etc. Such textual data can be mined to generate insights about the employee experience. Research has shown that organizations that take into consideration employee feedback in organizational decision-making are more productive, and have employees that are more engaged with the organization. In this talk, he will first describe the design and use of Social Pulse – a tool to make ...

SONIC Speaker Series presents: Johan Ugander

17
May

The SONIC Speaker Series presents Johan Ugander Management Science & Engineering Stanford University Ruffled Feathers: Trait inference beyond homophily SONIC Lab is proud to welcome Johan Ugander of Stanford University. Dr. Ugander will speak on Tuesday, February 6th, 2017 at 10 AM in Frances Searle Building, Room 1-483. Please contact Dr. Michael Schultz with any questions.   Abstract: The observation that individuals tend to be friends with people who are similar to themselves, commonly known as homophily, is a prominent and well-studied feature of social networks. While homophily describes a bias in attribute preferences for similar others, it gives limited attention to variability. In this work, we observe that attribute preferences can exhibit variation beyond what can be explained by models of homophily. We call this excess variation monophily to describe the presence of individuals with extreme preferences for a particular attribute possibly unrelated to their own attribute. We observe that monophily can induce a similarity among friends-of-friends on a network without requiring any similarity among friends. In order to independently simulate homophily and monophily in synthetic networks, we ...

Yuan Li successfully defends dissertation on leveraging meta data and topology to infer the role that a node plays in the network

09
May

Yuan successfully defended his dissertation titled “Inference in heterogeneous network”.  His research leverages meta data, namely node attributes and dyadic attribute, and topology to infer the role that a node plays in the network.  His committee consisted of Noshir Contractor, Wenxin Jiang, and Bruce Spencer.  Upon graduating with a PhD in Statistics, Yuan will work at Google’s Search Team as a Data Scientist.

Alexandros Nathan successfully defends dissertation on methodological and applied facets of machine learning

08
May

Alexandros successfully defends his dissertation titled “Essays in Machine Learning, Social Networks and Marketing”.  He designed novel distributed optimization algorithms and investigated problems that lie at the interface of social networks, and marketing, with an emphasis on customer retention and new product adoption. His committee consisted of Noshir Contractor, Diego Klabjan, and Brian Uzzi.

Jacqueline Ng successfully defends dissertation on how teams form and what they need to perform

07
May

Jackie successfully defended her dissertation titled “Teams and Organizing in the Digital Age:  How Team Networks Form and Why They Perform”.  Her research explores the relationship between how teams form and what they need to perform, highlighting a paradox between what teams do and what they ought to do.  Her committee consisted of Noshir Contractor (Chair), Jeanne Brett, Leslie DeChurch, Seyed Iravani, and Brian Uzzi.

How network theory predicts the value of Bitcoin

07
May

A recent research by Spencer Wheatley at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and a few colleagues shows that the key measure of value for cryptocurrencies is the network of people who use them. What’s more, they say, once Bitcoin is valued in this way it becomes possible to see when it is overvalued and perhaps even to spot the telltale signs that a market crash is imminent. Read the complete article here: https://arxiv.org/abs/1803.05663 And the article published by MIT Technology Review here: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/610614/how-network-theory-predicts-the-value-of-bitcoin/

Educational Game Website for Network Concepts

04
May

“It’s Nicky Case!” is a cool website where you can play different kinds of games related to network concepts such as complex contagion and small-world networks. Moreover, there are other games for game theory and theory of voting. Check out the website (http://ncase.me/)!